Design Tips, Web & Graphic Design

Design Ideas and Order

Anyone new to design might think that the design process is pretty straightforward – you have an idea, you search Google and you make something. Fair assumption, but it usually is anything but straightforward. This kind of approach to the design process won’t deliver the effects and quality that today’s audiences demand.

To do design justice and to solve problems through design, you need to take time to fully digest the problem and put a process of discovery in motion.

This involves innovative and conceptual thinking, knowing how to generate and execute ideas, building a keen eye for colour, type and other crucial design elements as well as developing a genuine passion for good design. These are all attributes that lead to creating effective designs.

Weather you want to create a simple flyer, a poster or an elaborate promotion ..

Design starts with sound communication skills so you can effectively communicate your ideas.

It’s a common misconception that all you need to design is a few skills in programs like Paint, Word or even more powerful programs like Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator.

When we think about the design aspects we want to pass on to people and small businesses we think about what we could use to introduce them to the importance of design, to give them real and practical tips they could implement immediately. There are many useful elements of design but the one thing that we found businesses have been able to implement quickly and easily is hierarchy.

Order In The House!

Hierarchy gives order and priority to elements contained within a page, a promotion, flyer, brochure or web page etc

We were once asked to assist a business with improving a promotional flyer that they had created. The flyer started off reasonably well – it had a title of “Want To Win This?”.

Immediately next to the barbecue were the words “All you have to do is give us your email”.

You might be thinking .. what’s wrong with that? We suggested to the client that the interest in the product had not been established. They had asked for something without creating a want or ‘desire’ for the product. The flyer did not talk about what was great about the barbecue, what it could do or why people would want to win it.

The flyer needed to answer what is commonly known in advertising and marketing circles as WIIFM (what’s in it for me). Now, we are not advertising or marketing specialists but there is a great model we have found invaluable when putting together promotions and information in general. This model incorporates WIIFM and is called AIDA.

Introducing The Lovely AIDA

AIDA is an acronym for Attention, Interest, Desire and Action. The image below details how each of these elements work.

If one of the elements within the AIDA model is not met within a promotion, it is highly likely to fail.

In our barbecue flyer example, our client had drawn attention by using a striking title and they asked for action by asking for people’s emails but they had failed to build interest and desire.

Are You Up For The Challenge?

When you are next putting together a promotion or if you have a promotion you are currently working on, do you think you could apply the AIDA model? If nothing else, we’d love to see if you already had the four AIDA elements covered or if adding them helped to make your message clearer.

We’d love to hear how you faired and what results you achieved by using AIDA.

In Our Next Newsletter …

AIDA assists in creating better communications and ‘hierarchy’ within communications, but in our next newsletter we introduce you to the ‘visual’ side of hierarchy by discussing how to use, place and order visual elements within promotions.

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